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burning bush

/Tag:burning bush

Chanukah Menorah, Burning Bush and Sotah

As I wrote in my previous post, Schrödinger  Menorah:  Burning  And  Not  Burning, the Lubavitcher Rebbe explains the miracle of Chanukah as a paradox of the menorah burning and not burning, thereby embodying the absolute nature of God, who is not limited by His infinity but combines all possibilities including infinitude (ko’ach bli gvul) and the finitude (ko’ach hagvul). The notion of the menorah burning and not burning easily lends itself to be cast in terms of the quantum superposition of states of burning and not burning. I couldn’t help myself to call it a Schrödinger Menorah. There a couple of problems, however, with this idea. Firstly, as the Rebbe wrote in 1971 in a letter to the editor of the Journal of the Association of Orthodox Jewish Scientists, “The idea of miracles implies [...]

The End of Days II

This post is a continuation of the earlier post, The End of Days I. In this Torah Portion, Shemot, we read about the encounter between Moses and the Almighty at the Burning Bush. And the angel of the Lord appeared unto him (Moses) in a flame of fire out of the midst of a bush; and he looked, and, behold, the bush burned with fire, and the bush was not consumed… Moreover, He said: 'I am the God of thy father, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob.' And Moses hid his face; for he was afraid to look upon God. And the Lord said: 'I have surely seen the affliction of My people that are in Egypt, and have heard their cry by reason of their [...]

By | January 5th, 2015|Mashiach (Messiah), Names of God, Uncategorized|1 Comment

I Am Who I Am: Conversation at the Burning Bush

Every theologian worth his salt along with many philosophers, from Plato and Aristotle to Descartes and Kant, attempted to prove the existence of God.  Tomas Aquinas, for instance, offered five “proofs”!  Others, such as Hume and Nietzsche, tried proving the opposite.  Little did they understand that proving the existence or nonexistence of God is a fool’s errand.  There are several reasons for that: 1.            The existence of God cannot be proven because… God doesn’t “exist,” not in the ordinary sense of existence anyway.  One can say that an object exists only so long as it may exist or may not. By stating that the object exists, we specify one of the two possibilities.  Similarly, a person can be alive or, God forbid, not alive.  By stating that a person is alive we specify [...]

Moses – the First Scientist

And the angel of G-d appeared to him in a flame of fire out of the midst of a thorn-bush; and he looked, and, behold, the bush burned with fire, but the bush was not consumed. And Moses said: "I must turn aside, and investigate this wondrous phenomenon, why the bush is not burnt." Shemot-Exodus III, 2-3   In this Torah chapter, Moses sees a strange sight – a burning bush not consumed by fire.  His scientific curiosity is aroused and he does what any good scientist does – he goes to investigate this “wondrous phenomenon.”  Moses was the first scientist recorded by the Bible. We, scientists, chase after wondrous phenomena to investing their nature. However, we often do it with arrogance, caring our own agenda and preconceptions.  Torah teaches us otherwise, as [...]

By | December 21st, 2013|Parshah, Science, Shemot, Uncategorized|1 Comment