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Symmetry

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Symmetry and Love — Jewish Chromodynamics

Ye are standing this day all of you before the Lord your God: your heads, your tribes, your elders, and your officers, even all the men of Israel, your little ones, your wives, and thy stranger that is in the midst of thy camp, from the hewer of thy wood unto the drawer of thy water; that thou shouldest enter into the covenant of the Lord thy God—and into His oath—which the Lord thy God maketh with thee this day. (Deut. 29:9-11) The above verses at the beginning of the Torah portion Nitzavim that is always read in the week preceding the Jewish New Year, Rosh HaShanah, are usually interpreted in terms of the unity of Jewish people: You are standing this day all of you [read: standing together in perfect unity]. This is not [...]

Entangled Sisters

Vayeitzei The story of entangled twins is continuing in the Torah portion Vayeitzei (Genesis 28:10–32:3.)  Structurally, it is very similar to the story of the previous Torah portion, Toldot (see Entangled Twins).  In this portion, we again read about two entangled siblings—albeit, this time, sisters—about deception and spontaneous symmetry breaking. Two sisters were Rachel and Leah. Moreover, according to Midrash, Rachel and Leah were twins (Seder Olam Rabbah). As twins, who emerge from the same womb, they were entangled.  They were somewhat opposite—one is introvert, the other is extrovert; one is beautiful, the other has weak eyes. Rachel and Leah are earthly embodiments of spiritual partzufim (configurations of sephirot—Divine emanations).  Kabbalah teaches that in spiritual realms, there is Partzuf Rachel and Partzuf Leah, which are two aspects of the Nukva—the feminine aspect of Godliness.  Partzuf Rachel represents [...]

By | November 8th, 2013|Entanglement, Parshah, Symmetry, Vayetze|0 Comments

The Entangled Twins

Entanglement is often called the most baffling and the most quintessential aspect of quantum mechanics. What is entanglement, in a nutshell? Two particles born out of one reaction (or two particles that interacted through a collision) remain connected, no matter how distant from each other. A change in the status of one particle instantaneously causes a change in the status of the other particle. Einstein called it "spooky action at a distance." Entanglement is often associated with a certain symmetry and corresponding conservation laws. For example, the law of conservation of angular momentum requires that the spin (the quantum-mechanical analog of the angular momentum) of two entangled particles always point in the opposite directions. This means that, if two entangled particles have their spin in a state of superposition of Up (↑) and Down (↓) and we collapse [...]